COMPANION

AP: 32

Crowns: 0

Guild: 

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Strength:  2

Speed:  19

Defense:  2

Energy:  9

Information

Name:  Moses

Age:  7 years old (28 in Raven years)

Species:  Raven (Corvus corax)

Height:  27 inches (70cm)

Appearance:  Moses is a large, inky raven. He has a wingspan of 61 inches (155 cm) and is tall and athletic. His physicality is rarely appreciated though, because of the biological disparity between him and his mostly mammalian peers.

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Hometown:  Whiteden, Brighthold

Character Skills

Dodge: 

[1 post cooldown] Moses's speed stat momentarily replaces his pitiful defense.

Mimic:  

[-1 ENG] The raven's complicated voice box and his pendant allow him to mimic a large array of sounds, even human speech. Used to distract or confused foes, this works best when enemies have a companion. The skill causes hesitation and can make an attack miss. The effectiveness of the skill diminishes by half every time he uses it in an encounter, the less effective it becomes. To mimic someone's voice, Moses has to hear it first.

Unkindness:  

[3 post cooldown] Moses calls out to his raven brethren, creating a smokescreen of birds he can take refuge in. The unkindness of ravens makes hitting Moses difficult, as it is unlikely the attacker can tell where one bird ends and another starts.

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Special Items

A circle pendant made of pale yellow cryptite permanently resides around Moses's neck. The necklace allows the intelligent bird to communicate vocally. The charm does not allow him to comprehend and speak all languages. However, it does allow him to speak in any language he knows, which is limited to the common tongue of the Kingdom of Loria (English) and corvid calls. The thin chain of the necklace, which hides under Moses's feathers, is made out of tessar.

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Backstory
Moses was born into a dying industry. Ever since Telestones were invented, the Messenger Bird business had been slowly becoming obsolete. Birds were used commonly throughout the Kingdom, but especially in Moses’s hometown of Whiteden. Whiteden was remote, and because of this remoteness, bird messengers were in high demand. Ravens were the most common messenger in the booming industry because of their nonmigratory nature and intelligence. Raven’s could withstand the cold and the heat, able to comfortably carry messages all over the Kingdom. Also, they could deliver messages to many different places instead of the pigeon’s limit of one.

Telestones changed the economic value of ravens almost overnight. Ravens are an invasive species, and could not be freed because of the havoc they could wreak on the ecosystem. But with an overabundance of the now useless messenger birds, the species had to be controlled. Eating ravens, using them as lab rats, or killing them became more common in an attempt to control the population. Purchasing a raven was smart at the time because of the cheap price the now useless birds were being sold for, and the multiple uses they could serve. But the ravens that were not eaten or killed did not do to loving homes.

Moses was one of the lucky, or unlucky, few that were sold to an ambitious young scientist. Isaac Eisler was very gifted in magic and the arcane and knew it. He was convinced he was going to be famous for his discoveries. His confidence was fueled by an unhealthy obsession with knowledge, and dangerous knowledge was the most enticing of all. After Eisler purchased the unemployed ravens, he started experimenting in his blindingly white, hostile laboratory. He plucked, prodded, and poked the group of ravens, hoping to unlock a path into The Intangible Instance without dying. He wished to cheat death. Eisler killed countless ravens and revived ravens with magic innumerable times for the pursuit of immortality. But, despite extensive testing, he still had no usable data.

Eisler had not thought it through. He could send ravens into the afterlife, but they couldn’t comprehend or even report back what they saw. To solve this new problem, he shifted his research from immortality to creating intelligent life. An impossible task, but if it could be done this hungry, morally ambiguous man would will it into reality. The scientist started by tampered with the birds’ brains. Intelligence is quantified by the ratio between brain mass and body mass. The size of a brain doesn’t automatically determine intelligence, to be intelligent you have to have a large brain with a respectively small body.

Eisler theorized that if he used magic to create an artificial skull for the ravens' naturally intelligent brain that he would be able to create an animal with consciousness. But to make it work, the skull would have to be larger on the inside than it appears to be from outside, a sort of Tardis-like skull. This sort of meshing of magic and organic material was dangerous and unethical, but Eisler didn’t care for his mortality or morality.

Eisler paralyzed the birds before operating, but anesthesia was too expensive in the isolated town, and using magic to numb the ravens’ senses was a waste of his stamina. He had to save his energy for the surgeries the scientist believed. So when Eisler accidentally abolished some of the birds’ brains from existence, expanded their brains to the point their skull exploded, liquified brains and skulls alike, and created a six-foot-tall raven, which Eisler promptly killed, the birds felt everything. Moses watched one after the other of his friends, his siblings, die in painful, horrifying ways but could do nothing but watch, trapped in a cramped wire cage, and wait his turn.

The first part of the operation: creating a new skull that is small enough on the outside to fit in his head, while big enough on the inside where a human-sized brain could dwell. His skull felt like taffy as Eisler pulled it into shape. His head felt like a balloon about to pop, and the only thing that kept it from shattering was two giant hands, squeezing his mind with fatal pressure. Creating a vast cavity that his new brain could fit in. Tears slipped silently from his scrunched eyes, forming a pitiful puddle on the steel countertop below him. The second part of the operation: resizing the brain and its components to increase intelligence.

When Eisler started manipulating Moses’s brain, it was excruciating. Moses could not even scream as his brain expanded, turning to fire. Eisler increased parts of the brain so Moses could understand language, make decisions and generally gain consciousness. The naïve scientist reveled in his success and immediately created the pendant that Moses still wears so he could talk. But Eisler did not think it through, again. After giving a bird that you have just tortured for years the ability to think, it would be common sense to assume the bird might want to hurt you back. But Eisele was blinded by pride, and soon that blindness would not just be a metaphor.

Moses had been trapped in hell for years, dying over and over again for the sick desires of a lunatic. So the first thing Moses did after his rebirth is enacted his revenge. He clawed his captor’s eyes out, ate his liver, and drilled into his brain. Eisler’s brain and foolish desire for immortality were the cause of all of Moses’s suffering. That loud, sick, twisted brain was finally silenced.

His black feathers turned crimson as he sat panting over his victim. A lake of dark blood contrasted the recently bleached floor. Moses stood panting on the chest of the corpse, breathing in deep breaths of air smelling of chemicals, iron, and death. After his rampage, he stared at the blood flowing from the mutilated face of his enslaver. And for the first time since Eisler had bought him, Moses felt peace. Then, living up to his name, he freed his brethren.